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20121010
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. and if they lose that belief. >> let's talk about a couple specifics that interest the business committee. energy reform clearly need to happen in america. it's so mired in politics. using some of the politics can be taken out of this? >> id. i think that energy security is so vital to not only quality of life but also our national security, that there will be some agreement moving forward. the keystone xl pipeline is a perfect example of politics getting in the way of sound energy policy. but there seems to be an emerging consensus that we can be north american energy independence within the next few years, as long as we do things right. now, that, the devil is in the detail there but making sure that you don't raise taxes on energy producers. because when you do that you raise taxes for all consumers. again from a manufacturing standpoint, we have a stake in this discussion because we use one-third of this nation's energy output. so every time energy costs increase, the cost of manufacturing increases and adds to the 20% cost disadvantage i mentioned. the regulatory burdens are enormous for the
very well. one of the very people supporting renewal energies which added more dollars per acre. today the value of products, $24 billion. and i was elected to congress was 12 billion. ag was 60 billion then, now over 200. we created a tremendous amount of wealth that has been built within the value added ag component of this. let's keep it up and keep taxes low unpredictable and let's have less government regulations and less intrusion in our lives. [applause] moderator: 30 seconds to respond. christie: you know, we have not been able to get much done. my energy policy is making sure that we just create energy positions, short term, long term, medium-term growth for energy, but i just want to make sure that everybody knows that i will be a consistent champion for wind and renewable fuels in this district and congressman king has not been. [applause] moderator: your response, congressman? steve: i happen to be the american wind energy champion designated by the american wind energy association. [applause] i am supported by the renewable fuel and it -- industry across the board so far a
energy in new england. to really focus on our downtown arts and innovation district. public safety obviously. my job as mayor is a cheap marketing officer in creating jobs and to do that we need to convince people that downtown is a safe place to invest and spend time with your family and friends so we have really been an advocate of community policing strategies strategies that improve the relationship between our police officers and our residents. also really making sure we evoke a sense of -- the one thing that has been the biggest challenge to holyoke is our perception and our image so i ran a campaign based on beginning to tell a new story about the city of holyoke that we are more than a city of problems and challenges for the city of opportunity and possibilities. to give you the sense of importance of young people and why my election made a big statement for a city we have a 15 member city council and the 10 member school committee of strong mayors and former government. i ran against a 68-year-old incumbent mayor who had only been mayor for a couple of years. he was an aid
. so continuing to engage, having confining areas of cooperation in areas of energy, the development, for instance, mess nuclear simple energy program under way. we are already cooperate with the chinese. find these areas, keep our markets open, but don't create a more hostile external environment that is absolutely essential. very important we keep the balance. there's a fine line between balance and provocation to we want to stay well on the side of balance of constructive environment spent dr. kissinger, i was surprised to hear you say that the comments made by both candidates used the term extreme deplorable leverage about china. i know you endorsed mitt romney. have you had that conversation with him? have you said i find your conversation really deplorable? ass. >> i see the advertisements of the two candidates every day are competing with each other on how to deal with the cheating things with china, and both of you cheat as applied to china. >> and trade. >> and trade. and it may be that in china they do not understand, and i am bothered by the fact that appealing to persons
a poll on the country in a lot of ways. so second, if we had a grand bargain on energy, how to exploit the bounty of natural gas in particular in the environmentally safe and sustainable way on the national basis i think those two things together would have a huge impact. so the question is how close are we to that? and i was saying about the middle east but it may apply to american politics is all important politics happens the morning after the morning after. so, i think -- hearing talking about the election. i don't know how the election is going to come up and make no predictions but i do ask myself if romney gets smashed i don't think the political problem is we have a center left problem and we have a far right party that is a structural problem. the republican party has gone nuts in my view. they've been at war -- there's been a simultaneous -- they've been simultaneously at war with physics at the same time. on the deficit and biological l2 mac, some of them for sure. so the question to me is what happens the morning after this election if romney loses. he wasn't far right enou
, and as for you i need help on things like energy policy. because that's going to be hugely important, and i want you to drive it because so much of it has to do with our public lands and attitudes locally that will help me help you in making this unreality. i think engaging, harnessing, and even asking for the help of the nation's governors. so typically me with the present once or twice a year and you get briefings as opposed to the present thing i need your help, please go out into the. i need help on health care 2014 is run the country. wing-ism clarity, your help. i need help on energy policy. here's the broad framework. let's help to fill in the gaps and make it a national effort, if you will. i think there's huge untapped potential in that area that could speak to bipartisanship. >> i agree with the. i think the biggest policy achievement probably the last 20th minute and welfare reform. 25 years i guess. now, 15 years, 96. that was done by clinton, begrudgingly accepted after modifying its on the other governors have a huge role in that a thing. angler, thompson, underpublicized and a cou
of president obama in the real energy he brought on the campaign trail in 2083 question of transparency in the good government we all envision. from my hit by 2010, that energy had dissipated. a lot of efforts had gone towards a lot of things and we were seen the dramatic transformation that a lot of us can visualize and imagine knowing that the power of data is, but it wasn't happening very much. and that caused me to do some work and i will describe here that results in some greeting. grading is a cool cruel art. what i did is look at the problem of lacking transparency. it looked to me like maybe the transparency community had communicated well enough what it was we wanted. a lot of efforts have gone out there that didn't have direction or designation. so i sat down to some technical people. i am a lawyer, so i have to go back and learned about how these computers work, talking to each other on the internet in things like that. i sat down with them data people to interpret and language that policymakers could understand what it was the data people need and in a paper that most of you
statistics and i was wondering if you thought that it was really all about the way they came out and energy they had or if what they were saying had as big an effect as the perception of how they are doing and how excited they are to be there? >> well, the first observation is clearly the aarp has lowered its membership age. it's a good thing you identified yourself. [laughter] no, look, i think the body language is important and i think the president hurt himself with without last night. i don't think that the romney side should think that it's going to be like that in the next debate. that was not what we wanted to project but look at the same time, you go back to the tape and break it down like ron jaworski did with the football game, romney had a lot of good stuff and points that he got across and i thought from a policy standpoint, i thought it was pretty rich. when people are complaining that boy they got too much into in the policy into deep in the woods, usually the complaint is there is not enough substance and there is too much style so i think, i think from that standpoint it was
sensibilities to interfear with your way of life. >> you're boiling over with energy. you want to change thing. so you look around. see a lot of things that need changing. people kill each other and they shouldn't. people are you hungry and she shouldn't be. people are cold and they're illiterate. they need shelter, they need books. the world needs changing. well it does need changing but if you're going to live with theries of us need to learn to play the game by the rules. [applause] >> finally we have a truncated clip of our favorite, "the daily show"'s report on a leftest protester in olympia, washington, who chained himself to a building in protest but it was the wrong building. >> meet jody mason, of olympia, washington. a man driven to protest. >> the bush administration gave the ultimatum to saddam hussein to leave iraq. i got ready and i got a chain and some locks and, i went to commit an act of civil disobedience by locking myself to a door. >> he meant to chain himself here, to this u.s. department of energy substation. but instead he ended up here, chained to the side door of a non
-- damage of america's policy. that's a focus on green jobs and alternative energy is imposing costs on america's economy. costs that the proponents of green jobs are not acknowledging. >> for the most part you write a lot about gender policies and politics, and is this a branch out for you to write about green jobs? >> i've also written, my books have been in the air agenda but i've written a lot in energy economics and in taxation. i'm a monthly columnist to tax knows. i've edited a book called overcoming barriers to entrepreneurship. that was published i roam and and littlefield two or three years ago so i wouldn't say it's a radical change. it's something i've been thinking about and writing about for a long time. >> thank you for joining us on booktv. >> thanks so much for having me on. >> up next on booktv, former north chicago superintendent of schools, patricia pickles, presents her thoughts on how to improve the american educational system. >> first, i thank the business leaders for allowing me to join my vision in education. i also want to recognize some of the groups for o
to address. when you consider energy more important than water. >> host: thanks from buffalo new york. what should the government be in our life? we posted on new york in my personal life while the federal government not much. state come of it more, local, a lot more. the federal government should be maintaining harmony among the states keeping them in line regards to protecting americans' rights keeping the nation in harmony that is on facebook. next up is cheri watching in des moines. an independent. good morning. >> caller: yes, i do agree with mitt romney. i think the government is getting way too big. that's my comment. thank you. >> host: next up is less in detroit. he wore on. good morning. >> caller: good morning. we in michigan have to decide in november whether to allow the state to come in to the city and as a public use to take over and print the financial manager were emergency manager for the cities that have financed the distress and take over the local government where they can come in and remove the city officials like the mayor and the city council. i don't think that's th
as important for the nation's economy. it reduces fuel burn, saves energy, and improves the environment. implementing this improves the efficiency and safety of aviation while adding jobs and strengthening our economy. the case for next generation has been and continues to be compelling. i would, again, like to thank you, mr. chairman, ranking member costello, and the committee for hosting the panel today. i look forward to any questions you might have. thank you, again, sir. >> thank you. mr. renadli. >> thank you, mr. chairman, members of the subcommittee, thank you for holding this hearing today. it's a catch all phrase over the last ten years that means everything to everybody in the aviation community. we are proud to be involvedded in the essential stake holder in nextgen development and participates in the advisory committee which mr. barger spoke of. the committee has done an outstanding job of simpling the elevator speech of what nextgen is. using satellite technology, reducing carbon emissions, using best technology to reduce voice community cations or voice saturation on fr
its nuclear facilities under the inspection regime of the international atomic energy agency. at the same time we emphasize on the stipulations of the nuclear nonproliferation treaty which we can give rights of all states to acquire nuclear technology for peaceful purposes. mr. president, the insistence of the united states and countries of the european union and others to impose unilateral economic measures violate, violates the regulations of international law on the principles of free trade, and raises questions about the legality and morality of such practices. based on this, we call for lifting the embargo imposed on cuba by the united states for decades. we also renew our call for lifting and stopping all unilateral coercive measures imposed on the peoples of other countries, such as venezuela, belarus, iran, syria and the democratic people's republic of korea. mr. president, our aspiration to achieve a positive reform of the international organization stems from our desire to find a world based on justice, security and prosperity for all the peoples of the world, away
and the key issues influencing peace and stability in the region. the book addresses topics such as energy and resource nationalism, strategic competition in the global commons and looked at demographic issues in the region, sought to understand the future of the nuclear energy in asia as well as many other topics. and then last year our volume build upon this research framework but narrowed the focus to examine the rising powers china and india, and specifically the challenges and opportunities presented by the remarkable growth of the major powers to read than this year's strategic volume the military challenge we have sought to refine our research agenda by examining one of the most immediate challenges stemming from china's rise and that is the advancing military capabilities and its strategic ambitions. last december once we haven't decided on the particular topic or theme for the book we sought to identify the very best and brightest scholars in the respective fields to come together to address this important topic with such wide-ranging implications. we were successful in bringing t
that if you desire to vote and do so, but energy is to be put into social movements which we demand on our own terms rather than putting faith in an elected official and crossing our fingers and hoping to do what we want. specifically for a contemporary example, the students into bed or on strikes for months because there was a proposed tuition hike that they said was completely unacceptable. it tried to make practice illegal. what has come of this? the tuition hike did not go through and the law forbidding process was repealed. i think -- >> would you please ask a specific question. >> i know. my question, i suppose, would be what do you see is the value of social movements for political change. >> thank you. >> thank you very much for that example. i think hopefully folks realize that actually the reason i was asked to testify before rumors of congress was because of my work on such a social movement. there were students on our campus who organized collectively to address this concern with our insurance and who saw that georgetown was providing an subsidizing contraception on insurance for t
older remember. he was in his 60's when he was running so he did not have the energy of richard nixon running in 1960 or obama running in 2008. >> and mrs. eisenhower, lott has been written about your parents relationship with the eisenhower's. how would you describe it? >> well i think that one of the things i enjoy doing when i was working on the project of eisenhower's retirement years was to look at that relationship and to think about it more and i'm amazed that eisenhower and nixon got along as well as they did because when you think about it, you have two presidents rumbling around together. a president is going to be someone who is very driven. he has an agenda. he has a vision. he knows where he is going so you have dwight eisenhower and then you have richard nixon who in 39 becomes a vice president who already is showing signs that he is on his way so the fact that they got along so well, i mean as well as they get i would say, think is a testament to several things but i think first of all eisenhower made the vice presidency significant. he sent my parents to 53 nations aro
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16